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Chunk Meets Image: The Effects of Chunking and Imagery on Mobile-Based Self-Learning of English as a Foreign Language

Chunk Meets Image: The Effects of Chunking and Imagery on Mobile-Based Self-Learning of English as a Foreign Language
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Author(s): Byoung Gwan Kim (Yonsei University, Korea) and Hye Rin Shim (Yonsei University, Korea)
Copyright: 2020
Pages: 22
Source title: Mobile Devices in Education: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Information Resources Management Association (USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-1757-4.ch030

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Abstract

This study investigated the optimal conditions under which foreign language learning takes place using a smartphone. The authors proposed that two factors, chunking and imagery, would increase language learning. On the basis of previous findings, they formulated three hypotheses: (a) the use of images will have a positive effect on learning English sentences; (b) the use of chunks will have a positive effect on learning English sentences; and (c) the combined use of images and chunks will have a greater positive effect on learning English sentences than either feature alone. A total of 92 Korean seventh graders participated in this study. To examine the learning effect of chunking (i.e., sentence segmentation unit) and imagery (i.e., visual aid) in an experimental setting, they produced a smartphone learning application that incorporated the two methods. The authors measured learning effect with respect to lexical memory retention (i.e., word retrieval ability) and word order composition (i.e., ability to arrange words according to standard English syntax). The results show that the main effects of both chunking and imagery were significant and that the interaction effect between the two on lexical memory retention was also significant. The interaction effect was greater in the delayed effect measurement than in the immediate effect measurement. These findings suggest optimal conditions for designing a smartphone-based, self-learning application.

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