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The Role of HBCUs in Preparing African American Males for Careers in Information Technology

The Role of HBCUs in Preparing African American Males for Careers in Information Technology
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Author(s): Lynette Kvasny (The Pennsylvania State University, USA), Eileen M. Trauth (Pennsylvania State University, USA) and K. D. Joshi (Washington State University, USA)
Copyright: 2016
Pages: 17
Source title: Setting a New Agenda for Student Engagement and Retention in Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Charles B. W. Prince (Howard University, USA) and Rochelle L. Ford (Syracuse University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-0308-8.ch013

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Abstract

African Americans represent only two percent of the professionals working in computer occupations. Many policy makers and researchers argue that the educational pipeline is the major impediment to hiring a more diverse workforce. In this chapter we review literature and use findings from our prior research to inform a discussion about the issue and challenges faced by African American male undergraduates enrolled in technology majors at HBCUs. Our work also highlights the unique role that HBCUs can play in broadening the educational pipeline through corporate partnerships and community outreach. We offer recommendations for attracting African American men to information technology, supporting them as they pursue undergraduate degrees, and providing professional development opportunities that foster successful careers in information technology. We conclude with a discussion of research trends to further understand the issue of under representation, and innovative strategies that HBCU s can adopt to broaden the participation of African American men in information technology.

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