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The Perceived Work Ethic of K-12 Teachers by Generational Status: Generation X vs. Baby Boom Generation

The Perceived Work Ethic of K-12 Teachers by Generational Status: Generation X vs. Baby Boom Generation
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Author(s): Gregory C. Petty (University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA)
Copyright: 2013
Volume: 4
Issue: 2
Pages: 12
Source title: International Journal of Adult Vocational Education and Technology (IJAVET)
Editor(s)-in-Chief: Victor Wang (Liberty University, USA), Judith E. Parker (Columbia University, USA) and John A. Henschke (Lindenwood University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/javet.2013040105

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Abstract

This was an investigation of the work ethic of K-12 educators from Generation X and Baby Boomer generations. Teachers of the baby boom generation were born between 1946 and 1964, and many are beginning to retire. There is an impending teacher shortage due to the large numbers of this group retiring or leaving the profession. School administrators and public school human resource specialists are beginning to focus on strategies to replace this experienced workforce. Administrators need to know if this group has different work ethic than later groups of teachers. In this study, Generation X teachers scored higher on the subscales of Easy Going, Dependable, and Committed. While Baby Boomers and Generation X teacher about the same on Dependable, Baby Boomers are more “engaged”. Though these differences in the subscales were not significant, The overall MANOVA for the comparison of work ethic as measured by the Occupational Work Ethic Inventory was significant at the p<.05 level. Many older teachers complain about the newer younger generation of teachers and their so-called “lack of a work ethic”. Unfortunately, there were not enough data to study teachers from the latest, millennial generation however, this study points to data that indicate there is more to this difference in perception that originally thought that could affect hiring and training of new generations of teachers.

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